9 Things Nobody Tells You When You Start College

smiling student with bag and take away coffee cup

Between the high school college prep courses and college orientations, one would think that first-year college students would be well prepared for college. Between my own college experience and my experience with working with students, I know that this notion is not true!  While college prep or honor classes may prepare students academically and orientations give basic information about a lot of stuff, there are some practical information that students are not getting that can make a difference in the ease of the college transition.


 

1. Read and keep your syllabi.  A syllabus contains every thing your professor wants you to know about the course.  Through the syllabus, faculty inform students about topic schedules, exam and homework dates, office hours and class room code of conduct.  Be sure to note if your final exam is cumulative (covers the whole semester of information) or not.  Read your syllabus carefully and keep them in a convenient place. While asking for clarification is okay, asking questions that the syllabus can answer may annoy your professors.

2. Buy your textbooks and but look for deals. Another important thing that is found on your syllabus is the title of your textbook.  YOU NEED A TEXT BOOK NO MATTER WHAT YOUR PROFESSOR SAYS! Many students that I consult who are not doing well in their classes just rely on their notes and/or their professors notes.  Yes, textbooks are expensive, but they are critical for course success. There are several ways students can save money on purchasing textbooks.  Students can ditch the paper version and choose the digital version.  Try discount textbook sites such as Amazon, Chegg, TextbookRush, or Half.com.  These sites offer buyback, rental and used purchased options.  Campus libraries may also have a copy of textbooks available.  For more ideas on how to save on textbooks, check out this Forbes.com article.

3. Use free campus tutorial services.  College is a game changer.  The perception of college tutorial services is vastly different from the perception of tutoring in high school.  Taking advantage of free tutoring is not a sign of weakness but it is sign of wisdom.  Students who take advantage of campus tutoring have higher grades and spend less time completing homework with lower levels of frustration.

4. Look for the free stuff! Get the most out of your tuition dollars.  They are so many things that you do not have to spend money on.  Besides free t-shirts and food, there are opportunities to travel to sporting events, conferences, leadership training, mission trips, and outdoor experiences.  Connect with your university campus life office, academic departments, student activities board, or student government association.  While most of the opportunities are offered to all students, many more are taken advantage of by students who are heavily involved in these organizations.

5. Where you sit in the class matters.  While sitting in a big lecture hall, you may feel like you are inconspicuous but professors are very observant.  Professors hold in high esteem those students who arrive on time, sit up front and are attentive.  This is the first step to developing critical relationships with you professors.  Building faculty relationships are important for gaining access career advice, internships and solid letters of recommendations for jobs or graduate schools.

6. Dropping and withdrawing from a class. You have the ability to remove a class from you schedule if difficulty arises.  Removing a class from your schedule during the 1st week of school is called dropping a class and doing this in the middle of the semester is called withdrawing.  Dropping a class does not show up on your transcript.  However, classes withdrawn from will be designated by a “W” instead of a grade on a transcript. Consult your academic adviser early on to decide if dropping or withdrawing from a class is the best alternative and will not interfere with your financial aid or academic status.Young african american student using a laptop - African people

7. Preview before class. Keeping up with a lecture can be overwhelming. You try to write big words neatly and quickly and translate what he/or she is saying all and attempt to understand all at the same time.  You may think professors are racing trying cover alot of difficult material; however, they think that you spent a little time going over the basics so they do not have to cover the simple stuff. Previewing before class can make lectures go a little smoother.  Previewing is NOT spending hours reading the chapter. Previewing is spending a little as 10 minutes watching a video, skimming and creating an outline. Try it and you’ll feel more confident and smarter in your classes.

8. GPA is calculated differently. In high school, all of your classes were all weighed the same (with maybe the exception of honors classes).  In college, some classes are given different credits depending on the number of hours you spend in class per week or the amount of effort.  A walking class or a laboratory class may be 1 credit hour versus a chemistry course that may be 3 credit hours.  An “A” in walking is not weighed the same as an “A” in chemistry.  If you have an “A” in walking , a “B” in English and in History, and a “C” in both math and chemistry in college, your GPA is a 2.6. Whereas, having the same grades in high school will yield a 2.8 GPA.  It may be a subtle difference, but when your GPA counts for so much in college 0.2 points really matters.  Try this handy GPA calculator .

9. Class enrollment alternatives. Scheduling courses is a juggling act.  You may not get the classes you need or want.  Instead becoming frustrated, students should inquire if their institution offers cross enrollment at nearby colleges and universities.  This means you remain a student your university but you take a course somewhere else.  Studying abroad also falls into this category.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s